The European Politics Blog

Political reform in Georgia

Parliamentary elections were held in Georgia on October 1st last year. The country voted in a new President, Bidzina Ivanishvili. The billionaire deserves praise for reforming the political system of a country so wrapped up in technocracy. The former ruling party, the United National Movement, led by Mikheil “Misha” Saakashvili came to power during the Rose revolution of 2003 and had before the recent elections governed the country in a dictatorship style.

Georgia is to become a parliamentary republic due to constitutional change, leaving behind its presidential republic status. Ivanishvili will become Prime Minister for the meantime with increasing powers coming his way later on during the term. Peaceful reform is a rare sight in the former Soviet Union. Saakashvili still has about a year in his presidential role which he will be sharing with Ivanishvili.

The winning party, Georgia Dream, is a coalition of people with various agendas against the former government, united in their desire to bring about necessary political reform. From pro-Westerners to liberals, there are many in the party who have had far too many disagreements with Saakashvili to be considered tasteful. There needs to be a more coherent policy in place than the present. Only improving relationship with Russia and creating a much more fairer society has been cited as policy points being worked on.

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